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FBI and local law enforcement team up to discuss school safety

On Friday, Drain also said even though class just started for this academic year, his department has already received multiple threats (ABC 7 Amarillo - Morgan Burrell).

This week was the first week of school for Amarillo and local law enforcement, along with the FBI Dallas division, are making themselves loud and clear. They will not tolerate hoax school threats.

Amarillo Police Chief Ed Drain said following the Parkland shooting, the police department received more than 50 hoax calls. On Friday, Drain also said even though class just started for this academic year, his department has already received multiple threats.

"Yes, we've had three threats on three different schools actually and all three of those people are currently locked up," said Sgt. Jerome Godfrey.

Godfrey, who is the supervisor of school liaison resource officers, said the first two threats happened the day before school started.

"One of them I got at 10:30 at night and I started calling my officers from home and we investigated it until we figured out exactly who it was and who the perpetrator was and we had them in custody and we made sure the schools were safe." said Sgt. Jerome Godfrey.

Jason Herring, with the Potter County District Attorney's office, said it is important students understand that what they post on social media is permanent.

"They may be thinking I'm being funny," said Herring. "I'm being cool, just watch this. You can end up with serious life-altering consequences."

Robert Love, the first assistant with the Randall County District Attorney's office, said it is also important students remember that in Texas, a 17-year-old can be tried as an adult.

"When you cause a reaction and when you cause the police to be involved and schools to shut down and lock down, you've also committed a third-degree felony all the way down to a class B misdemeanor," said Love.

Aaron Tapp, FBI Assistant Special Agent in Charge, said the FBI and local law enforcement work together when it comes to school threats.

"They will literally finish our sentences with relevant context and details about the student or about the school," said Tapp.

When it comes to threats, the school districts at Friday's conference say they are all taken seriously.

"It is important too that everybody understands that we're not playing and this is not a joke," said Amarillo ISD Superintendent Dr. Dana West.

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