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      Sewage Wars

      It may be a little town with not too much business, but don't let that fool you. Sanford, Texas may appear to be sleepy, but there's plenty of conflict brewing and it appears to be quite messy.

      Sanford is a small town, and may be getting smaller, but with any change sometimes comes controversy.

      Recently, Sanford's city council voted to bring in a central sewage system, but the mayor refused to go along.

      "I'm not against the sewer. I'm against the amount of money they want to charge and forcing people who have legal septics to hook up to it." said Sanford Mayor, Bernard Pacheco.

      Bringing in a central sewage system has brought high tension in the town. Many fear instead of helping the town, it will turn it into a ghost town. Other residents say it would benefit the town and potentially bring it back to life.

      The main concern is that with this project people will be paying just under $70 a month per household and in Sanford people have already threatened to board up their homes and leave.

      Resident, Donald Robertson said, "I feel that this sewer proposal has been forced on us. It's an attack against the senior citizens and disability people that live here."

      "Everyone here is on a fixed income. They can't afford it." chimed in Mindy Robertson "They're going to have to pack up and move."

      While most residents are on septic tanks, the town appeared to have many unfinished septics, creating a hazard for the elderly and young residents.

      Pacheco said he knows that people have bad septics, but his fear is that majority of the people in the town cannot afford the high expenses that come with this project.

      "We have a lot of elderly in this town that are on a fixed income. They have to worry about how to pay for their medicine, food, and now a sewer bill." said Pacheco "If they don't pay the sewer bill they cut off the water. If there's no water, there's no sense in eating and taking they're medicine."

      Pacheco believes there are better ways the town could work around a sewage system.

      Former Mayor, Rodney Orman said putting in a sewage system would eliminate maintenance fees for septic tanks by providing full time service, and would help the town attract business.

      Pacheco said he is proud of the city council for doing its job, but he wishes the town would invest in its fire department or parks before forcing people to invest in a sewage system.