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      Satellite repairman becomes local hero

      Rian Kirkpatrick became a hero when he performed CPR on a customer while in his home repairing the TV service.

      By Jared Tilbor

      ALBANY, Ore. - Nothing was going right for Rian Kirkpatrick on Sunday morning.And that turned out to be key when things went horribly wrong for Gary Darcey.Darcey, 75, was relaxing at home and waiting for Kirkpatrick to finish repairing his Dish Network service.Kirkpatrick got to the Darcey home at 8:30 a.m. but soon realized he need a part that wasn't in his truck.While meeting up with a colleague to get the part, Kirkpatrick's truck got stuck in the mud.By the time he returned to the Darcey home, it was noon.Turns out, Kirkpatrick was right on time.

      "It had been one of the worst days," he said, "and then all of a sudden it was like I was called on to do things, and I just went ahead and took care of it."As he repaired the Darcey's TV service, Gary Darcey turned red and started making audible grunts.

      Kirkpatrick took action while Bonnie Darcey called 911.

      "I pulled him down onto the floor, laid him out flat and I started chest compressions," Kirkpatrick said.Bonnie said her husband didn't have a pulse but that Kirkpatrick continued performing CPR for 10 to 15 minutes until paramedics arrived.First responders were not optimistic Gary Darcey, who has a history of heart problems, would make it. But soon after arriving at the hospital, Gary Darcey stabilized. Bonnie Darcey said the Dish repairman Kirkpatrick is a hero and the only reason her husband is now recovering in the hospital ICU.

      "Repairmen don't usually get a chance to be a hero," she said, "and he was."