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      Perryton students enjoy Spring Break Science Camp

      Parents have your kids been sleeping in and lounging around the house playing video games and watching TV this Spring Break?

      But Perryton is helping avoid that with its students. The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service in Ochiltree County has started the districts first-ever Science Camp. It was set up to keep students' minds active and give them something fun to do. It's this week's Region 16 Spotlight on Education report.

      It's the same battle parents and teachers face every time there's a break in the school schedule, boredom, the lack of learning, and the loss of what's been learned. So to fight that battle this Spring Break, Erica Hefner, the Family and Consumer Sciences Agent at the Extension Service, thought, why not put together this camp?

      "Video games and TV has its place in a home sometimes but not all day long. And so our kids are getting up off the couch they're coming to Science Camp. We have parents coming to help them so we're getting family time as well," said Hefner.

      They cover things teachers often don't have the time or the funds to do.

      "I just want to inspire some curiosity in Science so when they do cover this in school they'll have more questions, they'll be more likely to open their eyes and listen".

      From making exploding volcanoes to LEGO robots, and learning about bacteria and germs, the kids say they're excited to be at Science Camp.

      "We learned how to make volcano's make a robot, which was really really fun. And, we also learned about germs and plants," said Fourth Grader, Tobi Johnson.

      They're even excited to get off the couch.

      "We get to learn about interesting things about stuff we don't know about. 2:44:04"Because instead of just laying at home, I get to come and learn something interesting and new," said Fifth Grader, Ruby Lopez.

      "My dad thought I was going to lay in bed and sleep all day," said Fifth Grader, Caleb Powers.

      But the camp isn't just about learning.

      "We have a lot of hungry people in this community so we've been serving nutritious snacks," said Hefner.

      80 kids are participating in the camp. Hefner says it's been such a success, they plan on doing more in the future.