92
      Saturday
      90 / 67
      Sunday
      93 / 67
      Monday
      93 / 69

      Injured stray gets saved by multiple strangers

      Countless unclaimed animals wander the streets of the Panhandle. One small dog that happened to be injured was fortunate enough to be saved by a few acts of kindness of some unsuspecting strangers.

      West Texas A&M student Elizabeth Zadel was on her way from class when she saw the dog. But what she didn't know was how severely injured the dog was.

      "I didn't know her right arm was hurt," said Zadel. "I thought she was just stopping like that but then when I got closer I could tell someone probably hit her or something because she was just walking on three legs."

      Zadel immediately brought her to Critter Camp in Canyon to see what they could do. They took the dog in to see the vet where they discovered her leg would need to be amputated.

      "I think it's horrific that somebody would breed a dog and then let it run around Canyon that has an injury like that without taking care of it," said Terilynn Salazar of Critter Camp. "I don't think it's right."

      Surgery to amputate the leg and bring the dog back to health is a costly one. The operation is going to cost them almost $600. As a non-profit, Critter Camp started to solicit donations to help pay for the surgery. That was until they found a timely surprise in the mail Wednesday morning. Salazar received an envelope with $125 inside in checks and cash from an 11-year-old girl that in lieu of birthday presents, wanted her family to make donations to help the pets in need.

      When Gracie Ingham made this donation, she had no idea how fortunate the timing of her selfish act would be.

      "There were other people at my school who had done it," said Ingham. "I actually prefer to give donations to an animal place more than I wanted birthday presents."

      "It just touched me both that it came in the day that it did behind this little dog and that this little girl is thoughtful enough to try to take care of homeless pets instead of herself," said Salazar.

      And now it's because of Ingham's generosity that the dog that she would like to be named Lucy is even closer to getting the surgery she so desperately needs.

      It's not too late to help this dog. Her surgery isn't until March 20th and funds are still needed. If you would like to make a donation to Critter Camp you can call them at 655-8444 or send donations to 6106 W. Rockwell Road.

      Not only are funds needed, but once she is fully recovered, she will need a place to call home and a family to take her in.