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      Heavy rains cause flooding in the Panhandle

      Areal photo taken on Saturday before the flood crest, and before the road washed out.

      Pronews 7 spoke with Hansford County Chief Deputy, Gary Garrett on Monday, he said there are still a few roads that are water covered, but it is starting to recede.

      However there are still a few roads closed. State 15 between Spearman and Gruver is one of those road closures, TxDOT said they might be able to get it open Monday, if they can get a crew to the bridge.

      FM 250 from State 136 to FM 1060 has been washed out and will remain closed for now.

      Previously posted:

      Several areas across the Panhandle dealt with heavy rains, and flooding this weekend. That heavy rain turned some highway lanes into swimming pools and lakes after the rain saturated the areas.

      Saturday's severe storms headed toward Hansford County, but residents had no idea that they were in for an all day and night event.

      "Started about 3"30 they saw a funnel over by cap switch and from there it just kept going, it stopped turned the other way and dissipated, then it would build right there, dissipate and come again, and it did it over and over again," said Gary Urban a Morse resident.

      The Palo Duro Creek runs right by Morse and by Sunday morning it looked more like a lake. This isn't the first time they've seen it like this, severe flooding also happened back in May.

      Mark Irwin from Gruver was driving home around 5:30 Saturday, and said it was the most rain he'd seen in 30 years, at time the rain was so heavy he couldn't see 5 feet in front of him.

      "All the residents streets were flooded, just kept raining and raining straight down, you don't see that very often. A lot of times quick big rains happen there will be a lot of water running in the draw. But as far as closing the bridge I've seen it once or twice, and I've lived here for fifty six years."

      Morse, Spearman, and Gruver received almost 20 inches of rain, equaling what they normally see in an entire year.