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      Food programs in the Panhandle get good & bad news

      Some good news and some cautious news when it comes to making sure everyone in the Panhandle area gets a good meal.

      Two opposite ends of the spectrum...more food for one children's program, while food stamps recipients may see major cuts.

      On Tuesday morning, parked off of Southeast 7th was a dairy cow in her own special trailer. Okay, even in the this area, it's a unique site. A mobile dairy set up by the Southwest dairy Farmers. They've joined forces with Elanco to make sure the 3,000 food insecure children in the Snack Pak for Kids program has shelf stable milk to add to their diet.

      "We already offer 12 items for the kids, and we're going to be able to add shelf stable milk for each and every kid regardless if you're from Amarillo or not whichever part of the Texas Panhandle you're in and you're part of the program, milk will be available to those communities at no charge," said Dyron Howell with Panhandle Community Services.

      Elanco, a global food solutions division of the Eli Lilly pharmaceutical company provided incentives for dairy farmers and together today, they made a 50-thousand dollar presentation.

      "We really saw it as an opportunity to get involved and to get our customers involved and promote milk as well and more importantly to feed hungry children," said Senior Sales Rep for Elanco, Michael Harlien.

      Meanwhile, the High Plains food bank hasn't received a single shipment from the federal government in about 6 months, which means they've got to shell out hard case to stock their shelves.

      "We're relying more and more on purchased food and that's not a desirable place to be for us..." said Broc Carter, spokesperson for the High Plains Food Bank.

      If the USDA Farm bill goes through Congress in it's current form, the more than 16 billion dollars in cuts would mean almost 3-thousand food stamp recipients in Potter & Randall counties would lose those privileges, according to Carter. .

      "So what the cuts would be doing, unfortunately, what will happen is people who have some assets and are trying to get back on their feet will be taken off the program, which will cause them to go into those assets which could possibly put them back in the same position."