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      Attorney General: DNA tests implicate Hank Skinner in 1993 murders

      Hank Skinner being escorted into court.

      New DNA testing further implicates convicted murderer Henry "Hank" Skinner for the crime, according to the Texas Attorney General.

      Pronews 7 obtained the documents on Wednesday afternoon which were filed in a Gray County State District Court.

      Click here to read the entire DNA testing advisory.

      Skinner was convicted in 1995 for the 1993 Pampa murders of Twila Busby, his live-in girlfriend and her two grown sons. The murder happened on New Year's Eve.

      Initial DNA testing in 1995 implicated Skinner by showing that he was at the crime scene.

      The new DNA results showed Skinner's blood in the back bedrooms of the home where the murder happened.

      Click the video above to see archived footage from the 1993 murders.

      Skinner's DNA, according to the Attorney General's advisory, was also found on the handle of a bloody knife taken from the front porch of the home. At least one other contributor's DNA was also on the knife, according to the Attorney General.

      While Skinner has not contested that he was at the crime scene, he maintained his innocence. He said he was unconscious and intoxicated on the couch at the time of the murders.

      Skinner's attorney said the results should not have been released since the testing is still in progress.

      "We find it troubling that the Attorney General's Office has seen fit to release partial results of the DNA testing and submit its 'advisory' to the court while the DNA testing is still in progress," said Rob Owen, attorney for Hank Skinner. "The partial results which have been produced by the initial round of DNA testing show that at least one person other than Hank Skinner and the victims may have been present in the house on the night the murders took place, and may have had contact with one of the weapons used in the killings."

      Skinner was sentenced to the death penalty. He once came within one hour of being executed. Several times, the execution was postponed.

      Skinner had contended that new DNA testing would show that he was innocent. Starting in 2000, he pleaded for more DNA testing.

      "We have requested additional DNA testing that could improve the quality of the unknown DNA profile from the carpet sample, to allow authorities to submit it to CODIS, the national law enforcement DNA database, to search for matches there," Owen said. "We have also requested additional DNA testing of the stains from the knife, likewise hoping to develop further the DNA profile of the third contributor."